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storyhearts-journey:

Baby Mollusk - A tiny juvenile file clam (10x) Gregory Rouse

storyhearts-journey:

Baby Mollusk - A tiny juvenile file clam (10x)
Gregory Rouse

(Source: National Geographic, via bibidebabideboo)

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opticallyaroused:

Blood Moon
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nprmusic:

Tycho’s Awake is like a soundtrack to a sunbaked road trip, capturing the inexplicable nostalgia one feels while imagining a new life in a new town.

nprmusic:

Tycho’s Awake is like a soundtrack to a sunbaked road trip, capturing the inexplicable nostalgia one feels while imagining a new life in a new town.

(via skyflymy)

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excdus:

Pearl Fuji
shinichiro saka

excdus:

Pearl Fuji

shinichiro saka

(via lirbai)

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tajbourgeois:

Taj Bourgeois
Sun Mirror, 2014

tajbourgeois:

Taj Bourgeois

Sun Mirror, 2014

(via clavuline)

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mudwerks:

(via Melodic Incidents of the Irrational World - 50 Watts)

Leopoldo Méndez -1947, cover for Anthropos

mudwerks:

(via Melodic Incidents of the Irrational World - 50 Watts)

Leopoldo Méndez -1947, cover for Anthropos

(via danhallett)

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third-eyes:

tierramarga:

DOG STAR MAN - Stan Brakhage
 

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lich-tung:


//

lich-tung:

(Source: handeyemagazine, via bibidebabideboo)

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(Source: bergtagen, via bibidebabideboo)

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nevver:

Another fireball over Russia
Photoset

nevver:

The Chinese Obelisks, Edward Gorey’s Elephant House

(via porslina)

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cravingdesires:

tammuz:
Glazed bricks with a palmette motif from the ancient city of Susa dating back to the Achaemenid period in the 5th-4th century BCE. The bricks and motif are a trademark of ancient Babylon and can still be seen today on the walls of Ishtar Gate. When the Achaemenids made Babylon their royal capital, its famous glazed bricks and decorative motifs served as a model for the whole empire including the city of Susa. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

cravingdesires:

tammuz:

Glazed bricks with a palmette motif from the ancient city of Susa dating back to the Achaemenid period in the 5th-4th century BCE. The bricks and motif are a trademark of ancient Babylon and can still be seen today on the walls of Ishtar Gate. When the Achaemenids made Babylon their royal capital, its famous glazed bricks and decorative motifs served as a model for the whole empire including the city of Susa. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle